Several cannabinoids present in marijuana are proven to be POTENT anti-carcinogens

(Editor’s note: The following was left on the Wikipedia “Medical Cannabis” discussion page. We’ve reprinted it here. Enjoy!)

ANTI-CANCEROUS, ANTI-PROLIFERATIVE, ANTI-NEOPLASTIC, ANTI-INVASIVE TARGETING EFFECTS OF CANNABINOIDS USED IN A NON-SMOKED FORM TO FIGHT CANCER NEEDS TO BE ELABORATED

So, please, stop with the tip-toe bullshit of the subject. Stop acting like its only for “pain relief” for people undergoing chemotherapy. Hexahydrocannabinol, HU-331, Quinone, and several other chemicals present in cannabis are PROVEN to be POTENT ANTI-CARCINOGENS. IT GOES BEYOND PAIN RELIEF, and is PROVEN BY SCIENCE TO SHRINK TUMORS and trigger APOPTOSIS IN CANCER CELLS.

There is a REASON why cannabis is ILLEGAL, and THIS IS WHY. The only slant in my argument is a hunger for TRUTH and anger against people who hide this truth for the purpose of PROFIT.

From PUBMED, RUN BY THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES. A simple search of “Cannabinoids Anticancer” turns up THESE RESULTS:

1. Novel hexahydrocannabinol analogs as potential anti-cancer agents inhibit cell proliferation and tumor angiogenesis.

Thapa D, Lee JS, Heo SW, Lee YR, Kang KW, Kwak MK, Choi HG, Kim JA.
Eur J Pharmacol. 2010 Oct 13. [Epub ahead of print]
PMID: 20950604 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
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2. Cannabinoids inhibit cellular respiration of human oral cancer cells.

Whyte DA, Al-Hammadi S, Balhaj G, Brown OM, Penefsky HS, Souid AK.
Pharmacology. 2010;85(6):328-35. Epub 2010 Jun 2.
PMID: 20516734 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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3. The dual effects of delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol on cholangiocarcinoma cells: anti-invasion activity at low concentration and apoptosis induction at high concentration.

Leelawat S, Leelawat K, Narong S, Matangkasombut O.
Cancer Invest. 2010 May;28(4):357-63.
PMID: 19916793 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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4. Cannabinoid receptor ligands as potential anticancer agents–high hopes for new therapies?

Oesch S, Gertsch J.
J Pharm Pharmacol. 2009 Jul;61(7):839-53. Review.
PMID: 19589225 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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5. The endocannabinoid anandamide neither impairs in vitro T-cell function nor induces regulatory T-cell generation.

Lissoni P, Tintori A, Fumagalli L, Brivio F, Messina G, Parolini D, Biondi A, Balestra A, D'Amico G.
Anticancer Res. 2008 Nov-Dec;28(6A):3743-8.
PMID: 19189659 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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6. [Prophylaxis of chemotherapy-induced vomiting and nausea]

Tóth J, Szántó J.
Magy Onkol. 2008 Dec;52(4):391-4. Review. Hungarian.
PMID: 19068468 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] Free Article
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7. Expression and function of the endocannabinoid system in glial cells.

Massi P, Valenti M, Bolognini D, Parolaro D.
Curr Pharm Des. 2008;14(23):2289-98. Review.
PMID: 18781979 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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8. Interaction of plant cannabinoids with the multidrug transporter ABCC1 (MRP1).

Holland ML, Allen JD, Arnold JC.
Eur J Pharmacol. 2008 Sep 4;591(1-3):128-31. Epub 2008 Jun 27.
PMID: 18619955 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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9. Antineoplastic and apoptotic effects of cannabinoids. N-acylethanolamines: protectors or killers?

Pushkarev VM, Kovzun OI, Tronko MD.
Exp Oncol. 2008 Mar;30(1):6-21. Review.
PMID: 18438336 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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10. Cannabinoids as potential new therapy for the treatment of gliomas.

Parolaro D, Massi P.
Expert Rev Neurother. 2008 Jan;8(1):37-49. Review.
PMID: 18088200 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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11. The cannabinoid delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol inhibits RAS-MAPK and PI3K-AKT survival signalling and induces BAD-mediated apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells.

Greenhough A, Patsos HA, Williams AC, Paraskeva C.
Int J Cancer. 2007 Nov 15;121(10):2172-80.
PMID: 17583570 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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12. A cannabinoid anticancer quinone, HU-331, is more potent and less cardiotoxic than doxorubicin: a comparative in vivo study.

Kogan NM, Schlesinger M, Peters M, Marincheva G, Beeri R, Mechoulam R.
J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2007 Aug;322(2):646-53. Epub 2007 May 3.
PMID: 17478614 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] Free Article
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13. Medicinal cannabis does not influence the clinical pharmacokinetics of irinotecan and docetaxel.

Engels FK, de Jong FA, Sparreboom A, Mathot RA, Loos WJ, Kitzen JJ, de Bruijn P, Verweij J, Mathijssen RH.
Oncologist. 2007 Mar;12(3):291-300.
PMID: 17405893 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] Free Article
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14. HU-331, a novel cannabinoid-based anticancer topoisomerase II inhibitor.

Kogan NM, Schlesinger M, Priel E, Rabinowitz R, Berenshtein E, Chevion M, Mechoulam R.
Mol Cancer Ther. 2007 Jan;6(1):173-83.
PMID: 17237277 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] Free Article
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15. A cannabinoid quinone inhibits angiogenesis by targeting vascular endothelial cells.

Kogan NM, Blázquez C, Alvarez L, Gallily R, Schlesinger M, Guzmán M, Mechoulam R.
Mol Pharmacol. 2006 Jul;70(1):51-9. Epub 2006 Mar 29.
PMID: 16571653 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] Free Article
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16. Cannabinoids and cancer: causation, remediation, and palliation.

Hall W, Christie M, Currow D.
Lancet Oncol. 2005 Jan;6(1):35-42. Review.
PMID: 15629274 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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17. Arachidonyl ethanolamide induces apoptosis of uterine cervix cancer cells via aberrantly expressed vanilloid receptor-1.

Contassot E, Tenan M, Schnüriger V, Pelte MF, Dietrich PY.
Gynecol Oncol. 2004 Apr;93(1):182-8.
PMID: 15047233 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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18. Cannabinoids: potential anticancer agents.

Guzmán M.
Nat Rev Cancer. 2003 Oct;3(10):745-55. Review.
PMID: 14570037 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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19. Possible endocannabinoid control of colorectal cancer growth.

Ligresti A, Bisogno T, Matias I, De Petrocellis L, Cascio MG, Cosenza V, D'argenio G, Scaglione G, Bifulco M, Sorrentini I, Di Marzo V.
Gastroenterology. 2003 Sep;125(3):677-87.
PMID: 12949714 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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20. Targeting CB2 cannabinoid receptors as a novel therapy to treat malignant lymphoblastic disease.

McKallip RJ, Lombard C, Fisher M, Martin BR, Ryu S, Grant S, Nagarkatti PS, Nagarkatti M.
Blood. 2002 Jul 15;100(2):627-34.
PMID: 12091357 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE] Free Article

And the list goes ON AND ON:

Cannabinoids Induce Apoptosis of Pancreatic Tumor Cells via Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress–Related Genes Arkaitz Carracedo1, Meritxell Gironella2, Mar Lorente1, Stephane Garcia2, Manuel Guzmán1, Guillermo Velasco1, and Juan L. Iovanna2 + Author Affiliations

1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I, School of Biology, Complutense University, Madrid, Spain and 2U624 Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Marseille, France Requests for reprints: Guillermo Velasco, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I, School of Biology, Complutense University, c/ José Antonio Novais s/n, 28040 Madrid, Spain. Phone: 34-91-394-4668; Fax: 34-91-394-4672; E-mail: gvd@bbm1.ucm.es. Abstract Pancreatic adenocarcinomas are among the most malignant forms of cancer and, therefore, it is of especial interest to set new strategies aimed at improving the prognostic of this deadly disease. The present study was undertaken to investigate the action of cannabinoids, a new family of potential antitumoral agents, in pancreatic cancer. We show that cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human pancreatic tumor cell lines and tumor biopsies at much higher levels than in normal pancreatic tissue. Studies conducted with MiaPaCa2 and Panc1 cell lines showed that cannabinoid administration (a) induced apoptosis, (b) increased ceramide levels, and (c) up-regulated mRNA levels of the stress protein p8. These effects were prevented by blockade of the CB2 cannabinoid receptor or by pharmacologic inhibition of ceramide synthesis de novo. Knockdown experiments using selective small interfering RNAs showed the involvement of p8 via its downstream endoplasmic reticulum stress–related targets activating transcription factor 4 (ATF-4) and TRB3 in Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol–induced apoptosis. Cannabinoids also reduced the growth of tumor cells in two animal models of pancreatic cancer. In addition, cannabinoid treatment inhibited the spreading of pancreatic tumor cells. Moreover, cannabinoid administration selectively increased apoptosis and TRB3 expression in pancreatic tumor cells but not in normal tissue. In conclusion, results presented here show that cannabinoids lead to apoptosis of pancreatic tumor cells via a CB2 receptor and de novo synthesized ceramide-dependent up-regulation of p8 and the endoplasmic reticulum stress–related genes ATF-4 and TRB3. These findings may contribute to set the basis for a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. (Cancer Res 2006; 66(13): 6748-55)

So, please, stop with the tip-toe bullshit of the subject. Stop acting like its only for “pain relief” for people undergoing chemotherapy. Hexahydrocannabinol, HU-331, Quinone, and several other chemicals present in cannabis are PROVEN to be POTENT ANTI-CARCINOGENS. IT GOES BEYOND PAIN RELIEF, and is PROVEN BY SCIENCE TO SHRINK TUMORS and trigger APOPTOSIS IN CANCER CELLS.

There is a REASON why cannabis is ILLEGAL, and THIS IS WHY. The only slant in my argument is a hunger for TRUTH and anger against people who hide this truth for the purpose of PROFIT.

See Also: Cannabis cures cancer – the government has known since 1974

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5 thoughts on “Several cannabinoids present in marijuana are proven to be POTENT anti-carcinogens

  1. There is a huge leap between these theoretical, invitro or animal-based scientific studies of particular cannabinoids and the use of cannabis as medicine. It is very damaging to the cause to make extravagant claims that stretch credulity. Obviously there is truth in what you say but you do more harm than good if overstate your case.

    Clearly there is huge potential for therapeutic benefit but the powerful effects observed are also a reasion for caution.

    No one wants to see properly regulated availability of cannabis more than me. Howver,we have to be very careful about exaggeration and hyperbole.

  2. Dear Peter…

    But here’s the problem, it’s not exaggeration. This is a list of studies with results that show these cannabinoids have been known to fight different forms of cancer. That’s a fact. No where in this article does it say that ‘pot curse cancer’. But every time someone posts this information, someone pipes up with, “Let’s not exaggerate.” I agree, we shouldn’t overstate the facts.

    But saying that “Different substances in marijuana have been shown, in multiple clinical studies for more than 20 years, to have cancer fighting properties” is not hyperbole, it’s fact. And saying, “The government continues to ignore these facts and not even allow additional testing so real medical treatments can be devised, and the big pharma companies are heavily involved in the lobbies against medical/recreational legalization efforts” is also not hyperbole, it’s easily research reality.

    It’s one thing to caution against aggrandized claims, it’s another to act like every big claim goes to far. Based on the research so far, cannabis has the potential to be the most significant substance that western medicine has ever used or synthesized, if they’d get their heads out of their asses. That’s reality, and we need to shove these studies down the throats of those who tell us we’re overstating it’s potential impact. Because this is just the research people have been able to do with it illegal in the bulk of the industrialized world.

    But do you know what is hyperbole, which they’ve been using to further confuse and talk-down to the legalization movement, “Smoking marijuana is as bad for you as smoking cigarettes. It must be; you’re inhaling smoke!”

  3. I am a tireless campaigner for the medicinal benefits of cannabis so don’t doubt my intentions or allegiance to the cause. My concern is solely how can we most effectively communicate the truth.

    In my experience, I never hear anyone saying “Let’s not exaggerate.” I do see people turned off all the time saying “It’s some stoner idea that hemp and weed will save the planet”

    Although I have no medical qualifications, I have worked in medical, healthcare and pharmaceutical journalism for over 20 years. I have a pretty good understanding of which research studies are meaningful and which aren’t.

    What I’m really calling for is a physician of utmost repute who will cut through the hundreds of cannabinoid related studies and say what is really significant.

    Prohibition is a fundamentally immoral and evil policy which has, effectively, been overturned in America. You don’t know how lucky you are compared to Britain.

    However, less is more and we need to make fewer claims but more effectively.

    More power to your elbow. I am a constant follower.

    http://peterreynolds.wordpress.com/2011/01/15/reform-regulate-realise/

    http://peterreynolds.wordpress.com/2011/01/07/the-cannabis-campaign-in-2011/

    http://peterreynolds.wordpress.com/2010/10/08/cannabis-is-a-wonderful-thing/

  4. Hello. I agree that we need to talk more about the scientific research findings. Sometimes, more is okay and better.

    One of my favorite periodicals is, “Science News.” Not too long ago they reported on the research findings you speak of regarding Cannabis and cancer, along with the effects on cancerous tumors.

    GW Pharmaceuticals publicly shares their research findings about the different types of medical benefits of Cannabis. I don’t understand why more doctors are not aware of this research and really, more people in general.

    I’m constantly surprised at how the media and people with a certain agenda, use one research study to make the claim that Cannabis, a.k.a. marijuana, causes mental illness. This simply hasn’t been proven and is not what you see published in science journals. Actually, it is nearly the opposite of what you will find if you start researching.

    There are chemicals in Cannabis that offer great relief from some of the symptoms of mental illnesses, particularly to the one we most often hear through the media that marijuana can cause, which is schizophrenia.

    The current most widely accepted treatment for schizophrenia is the use of antipsychotics, which to the best of my knowledge, are some of the most dangerous drugs a person can take. These drugs not only have many side-effects, but are literally guaranteed to cause other very serious diseases and conditions.

    Apparently, THC is not of particular good use to patients with certain mental illnesses, but other chemicals in Cannabis have the potential to treat the symptoms. I think it would be a miracle to have a treatment for schizophrenia that will not eventually disable or kill you.

    We need to educate ourselves and others so we can help support the funding necessary for more in depth scientific research. We need to speak up and start challenging the myths and exaggerated unproven conclusions.

  5. Pingback: Are cannabinoids anticarcinogenic? - Grasscity.com Forums

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