Are the Feds Blocking Medical Marijuana Research?

See Also: New York Times Exposes Government Conspiracy to Prevent Medical Marijuana Research

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(Source: MyFoxAtlanta)  About eight out of 10 Americans favor legalizing marijuana for medicinal use. Fourteen states have now done so. The Obama administration has announced it will not prosecute medical marijuana users.

Yet the federal government is making it exceedingly difficult for research to verify that marijuana is an effective treatment for conditions ranging from glaucoma to multiple sclerosis, reported The New York Times .

Many patients with conditions such as cancer, glaucoma, AIDS or chronic pain swear by marijuana’s effectiveness. It appears at least as safe as many prescription drugs used for similar purposes. Yet there have been few scientific studies on it, and even fewer with conclusive results. Much of the evidence for its validity as a medical treatment is anecdotal.

In the United States, researchers who wish to study the effects of marijuana have only one source for their raw material. It is grown at the University of Mississippi, and its distribution is controlled by multiple federal agencies. To use it, researchers must apply to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and must get approvals from the DEA, FDA and a special Public Health Service panel.

The majority of research requests are denied by one or more of these agencies. If they are approved, the researchers are limited to the few varieties of marijuana grown by the university. Other varieties have somewhat different medicinal properties, which cannot be studied as long as access to them is denied. The federal government does not make it as difficult to study Ecstasy or LSD.

In 1985, the FDA approved Marinol , a pill made from synthetic THC, an active chemical in marijuana. The agency claimed that it has the same medicinal effects and less risk. Many patients who have taken Marinol, however, say it did not work for them, or gave them more side effects than smoking marijuana.

Deaths from Marijuana v. 17 FDA-Approved Drugs – from ProCon


DRUG CLASSIFICATION
Specific
Drugs per
Category
Primary
Suspect of the Death
Secondary Suspect (Contributing to death)
Total Deaths Reported
1/1/97 – 6/30/05
A. MARIJUANA
also known as: Cannabis sativa L
Marijuana
Cannabis
Cannabinoids
0
279
279
B. ANTI-EMETICS
(used to treat vomiting)
196
429
625
C. ANTI-SPASMODICS
(used to treat muscle spasms)
118
56
174
D. ANTI-PSYCHOTICS
(used to treat psychosis)
1,593
702
2,295
E. OTHER POPULAR DRUGS
(used to treat various conditions including ADD, depression, narcolepsy, erectile dysfunction, and pain)
8,101
492
8,593
F. TOTALS of A-E
Number
of Drugs
in Total
Primary
Suspect of the Death
Secondary Suspect (Contributing to death)
Total Deaths Reported
1/1/97 – 6/30/05
  • TOTAL DEATHS FROM MARIJUANA
1
0
279
279
  • TOTAL DEATHS FROM 17 FDA-APPROVED DRUGS
17
10,008
1,679
11,687

V. Chart of Deaths from Marijuana and 17 FDA-Approved Drugs

A. Marijuana
DRUG (Year Approved)
Primary Suspect of the Death
Secondary Suspect (Contributing to death)
Total Deaths Reported
1/1/97 – 6/30/05
1. Marijuana (not approved)
also known as: Cannabis sativa L
0
109
109
2. Cannabis (not approved)
also known as: Cannabis sativa L
0
78
78
3. Cannabinoids
(unclear if these mentions include non-plant cannabinoids)
0
92
92
Sub-Total – Anti-Emetics
0
279
279
FDA-Approved Drugs Prescribed in Place of Medical Marijuana

B. Anti-Emetics

DRUG (Year Approved)
Primary Suspect of the Death
Secondary Suspect (Contributing to death)
Total Deaths Reported
1/1/97 – 6/30/05
1. Compazine (1980)
also known as: Phenothiazine, prochlorperazine
15
30
45
2. Reglan (1980)
also known as: Metaclopramide, Paspertin, Primperan
37
278
315
3. Marinol (1985)
also known as: Dronabinol
4
1
5
4. Zofran (1991)
also known as: Ondansetron hydrochloride
79
76
155
5. Anzemet (1997)
also known as: Dolasetron mesylatee
22
5
27
6. Kytril (1999)
also known as: Granisetron hydrochloride
36
24
60
7. Tigan (2001)
also known as: Trimethobenzamide
3
15
18
Sub-Total – Anti-Emetics
196
429
625
C. Anti-Spasmodics
DRUG (Year Approved) Primary Suspect of the Death Secondary Suspect (Contributing to death) Total Deaths Reported
1/1/97 – 6/30/05
1. Baclofen (1967)
also known as: Lioresal, 4-amino-3-(4-chlorophenyl)-butanoic acid
72
33 105
2. Zanaflex (1996)
also known as: Tizanidine hydrochloride, Sirdalud, Ternelin
46 23 69
Sub-Total – Anti-Spasmodics 118 56 174
D. Anti-Psychotics
DRUG (Year Approved)
Primary Suspect of the Death
Secondary Suspect (Contributing to death)
Total Deaths Reported
1/1/97 – 6/30/05
1. Haldol (1967)
also known as: Haloperidol, Haldol Decanoate, Serenace, Halomonth
450
267
717
2. Lithium (1970)
also known as: Lithium Carbonate, Eskalith, Lithobid, Lithonate, Teralithe, Lithane, Hypnorex, Limas, Lithionit, Quilonum
175
133
308
3. Neurontin (1994)
also known as: Gabapentin
968
302
1,270
Sub-Total – Anti-Psychotics
1,593
702
2,295
E. Other Well-Known and Randomly Selected FDA-Approved Drugs
DRUG (Year Approved)
Primary Suspect of the Death
Secondary Suspect (Contributing to death)
Total Deaths Reported
1/1/97 – 6/30/05
1. Ritalin (1955)
also known as: Methylphenidate, Concerta, Medadate, Ritaline
(used to treat ADD and ADHD)
121
53
174
2. Wellbutrin (1997)
also known as: Bupropion Hydrochloride, Zyban, Zyntabac, Amfebutamone
(used to treat depression & anxiety)
1,132
220
1,352
3. Adderall (1966)
also known as: Dextroamphetamine Saccharate, Amphetamine Aspartate, Dextroamphetamine Sulfate USP, Amphetamine Sulfate USP
(used to treat narcolepsy or to control hyperactivity in children)
54
12
66
4. Viagra (1998)
also known as: Sildenafil Citrate
(used to treat erectile dysfunction)
2,254
40
2,294
5. Vioxx* (1999)
also known as: Rifecixub, Arofexx
(used to treat osteoarthritis and pain)
4,540
167
4,707
Sub-Total – Other Popular Drugs
8,101
492
8,593
F. TOTALS of A-E
Primary Suspect
Secondary Suspect (Contributing to death)
Total Deaths Reported
1/1/97 – 6/30/05
  • TOTAL DEATHS FROM MARIJUANA
0
279
279
  • TOTAL DEATHS FROM 17 FDA-APPROVED DRUGS
10,008
1,679
11,687

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One thought on “Are the Feds Blocking Medical Marijuana Research?

  1. its just not right, here we have a plant that does not need to be processed nor do we need a rainforest to find it.

    (the rainforest part is about the anti-logging people who state there are miracle plants in the amazon)

    Like

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