Oregon Senate passes bill to allow medical marijuana for PTSD treatment

The Senate passed a bill today that would allow people with post-traumatic stress disorder to get medical marijuana cards, but not all lawmakers were sold on the idea.

Senate Bill 281, which passed on a 19-11 vote, is now headed to the House.

The issue divided many of the Senate Republicans, some who weren’t convinced that medical marijuana would effectively treat the anxiety disorder.

While there has been anecdotal evidence about its beneficial effects on post-traumatic stress disorder there isn’t a consensus about the drug in the medical community.

Sen. Alan Olsen, R-Canby, said while he understands the responsibility to help people with this disorder he remains skeptical about whether marijuana should be used as medicine for PTSD.

“You know you could sit down with a bottle of Jack Daniels and listen to Charlie Daniels and probably get the same effect,” Olsen, a former narcotics investigator, told lawmakers.

Sen. Jeff Kruse, R-Roseburg, said he voted against the bill because he believes that marijuana should be treated like any other medicine.

An amendment that Kruse introduced in committee would require medical marijuana users renew their registry identification card after 60 days instead of annually did not pass.

Democratic lawmakers said they were persuaded by testimony in committee from veterans, who told them medical marijuana helped them deal with nightmares and other symptoms.

“We have something that will take care of that and allow them to not have flashbacks, to be able to sleep and to not have nightmares that person should be allowed to have (medical marijuana),” said Sen. Laurie Monnes Anderson, D-Gresham.

Medical marijuana is currently allowed in the state for patients with certain debilitating medical conditions such as cancer, glaucoma, Alzheimer’s disease, HIV and AIDS. The bill would add PTSD – a type of anxiety disorder that occurs in people who have seen or experienced a traumatic event — to that list.

Marijuana is still illegal under federal law and classified as a Schedule I controlled substance, meaning there is no accepted medical use of the drug

The Senate passed a bill today that would allow people with post-traumatic stress disorder to get medical marijuana cards, but not all lawmakers were sold on the idea.

Senate Bill 281, which passed on a 19-11 vote, is now headed to the House.

The issue divided many of the Senate Republicans, some who weren’t convinced that medical marijuana would effectively treat the anxiety disorder.

While there has been anecdotal evidence about its beneficial effects on post-traumatic stress disorder there isn’t a consensus about the drug in the medical community.

Sen. Alan Olsen, R-Canby, said while he understands the responsibility to help people with this disorder he remains skeptical about whether marijuana should be used as medicine for PTSD.

“You know you could sit down with a bottle of Jack Daniels and listen to Charlie Daniels and probably get the same effect,” Olsen, a former narcotics investigator, told lawmakers.

Sen. Jeff Kruse, R-Roseburg, said he voted against the bill because he believes that marijuana should be treated like any other medicine.

An amendment that Kruse introduced in committee would require medical marijuana users renew their registry identification card after 60 days instead of annually did not pass.

Democratic lawmakers said they were persuaded by testimony in committee from veterans, who told them medical marijuana helped them deal with nightmares and other symptoms.

“We have something that will take care of that and allow them to not have flashbacks, to be able to sleep and to not have nightmares that person should be allowed to have (medical marijuana),” said Sen. Laurie Monnes Anderson, D-Gresham.

Medical marijuana is currently allowed in the state for patients with certain debilitating medical conditions such as cancer, glaucoma, Alzheimer’s disease, HIV and AIDS. The bill would add PTSD – a type of anxiety disorder that occurs in people who have seen or experienced a traumatic event — to that list.

Marijuana is still illegal under federal law and classified as a Schedule I controlled substance, meaning there is no accepted medical use of the drug. Source

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See our articles on PTSD and Cannabis

2 thoughts on “Oregon Senate passes bill to allow medical marijuana for PTSD treatment

  1. You have to wonder just how low the bar has gotten… to be a republican in the Congress or Senate… Their judgement seems so extreme, and flawed…with no ability to reason or comprehend ANYTHING! They can’t even do the right thing for our veterans…to even DISCUSS giving them relief, because it is beyond their grasp. I think these reps. need to tested….to see if they are qualified for the job…. They are supposed to represent OUR interests, not theirs, or their corporate owner.

    Like

  2. Leave it to some ex cop to say something stupid.Ok people,everytime you feel anxious,drop what you’re doing grab a bottle of Jack and a good ol’ Charlie Daniels album.Your liver will thank you

    Like

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