Medical marijuana debate – Dr Oz Show, March 29 2011

From the Dr Oz Show

Questions can be directed to Dr Oz by going here

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Is marijuana a powerful medical tool or a public health hazard? Since being diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, Montel Williams has launched a personal campaign to find a cure for MS and legalize medical marijuana. From the time he began taking medical marijuana, no additional plaque has formed in his brain.

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Doctors prescribe medical marijuana to treat cancer, AIDS, multiple sclerosis, arthritis, glaucoma and migraines. But is it addictive? Dr. Oz shares his research and the audience weighs in. Continue reading

Montel Williams on The Doctors – “Marijuana pipe was for my medication”

“I use that pipe as a tool to administer my medication,” Williams says, “I should have safe access to it.”

In an episode of “The Doctors” set to air on Wednesday, Montel Williams candidly discusses his recent arrest for possession of drug paraphernalia, an arrest Williams still maintains was unjust.  Williams, who has long since suffered from multiple sclerosis, says the marijuana pipe he was cited for at a Milwaukee airport last month is used solely for medicinal purposes. Source

No Accepted Medical Use? Three Perspectives on Medical Cannabis (Reason.tv)

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The U.S. government classifies marijuana—along with heroin and LSD—as a Schedule I drug, the most tightly restricted category of drugs in the United States. According to the federal government, Schedule I drugs are unsafe and have “no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States.”

Really?

As medical marijuana proponents have pointed out since the Controlled Substances Act was passed by Congress in 1970, cannabis has been used medicinally for thousands of years, and there has never been a reported case of a marijuana overdose. Moreover, in recent years clinical researchers around the world have demonstrated the medicinal value of cannabis.

We talked to a doctor, a pharmacist, and a patient to get three firsthand perspectives on medical cannabis. Special thanks to Dr. Donald Abrams, JoAnna LaForce and Don Grubbs.

Approximately 10 minutes. Produced by Paul Feine and Alex Manning.

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Over 2,500 Subjects Since 1995 Have Used Marijuana-Based Medicines In Controlled Clinical Trials

[Via NORML – editor’s note: This post is excerpted from this week’s forthcoming NORML weekly media advisory. To have NORML’s media advisories delivered straight to your in-box, sign up for NORML’s free e-zine here.]

Researchers worldwide have performed 37 separate clinical trials assessing the therapeutic safety and efficacy of inhaled cannabis and marijuana-based medicines since 2005, according to a review published online last week in the journal Cannabinoids: The Journal of the International Association for Cannabinoid Medicines (IACM).
Continue reading

Cannabis Beneficial for Multiple Sclerosis Patients, Study Finds

(NaturalNews) A systematic review conducted by The Global Neuroscience Initiative Foundation found that five of six controlled trials reported a reduction in spasticity and an improvement in mobility amongst multiple sclerosis patients using cannabis extracts.

The two researchers, Shaheen Lakhan and Marie Rowland from the Los Angeles-based foundation, searched for trials evaluating cannabis extracts. Specifically, they were looking for extracts known as delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). Their study was published in the December 2009 issue of BMC Neurology.1

What they were trying to correlate was the benefits of these two extracts for treating one of multiple sclerosis’ most hard to treat symptoms: spasticity. Spasticity is the involuntary tension or contraction of muscles and is one of the most common and tell-tale symptoms of MS. Most of the current therapies and medications for this symptom are hard to obtain, have a poor track record, or come with intolerable side effects.

Of course, the introduction of THC and CBD into patient groups came with some side effects, most notably intoxication. The level depended on the treatment dose and, interestingly, was also reported in the placebo groups of the studies as well.

The studies considered included those only with THC and CBD combinations used for the therapies and only for the specific treatment of spasticity in MS patients.

Each study had varying outcomes, but the overall trend between them showed a reduced spasticity in treated patients and an improvement in general symptom reduction. The adverse events reported with these studies were generally considered well-tolerated by the patient and relatively mild.

The medical benefits of cannabis have been long known to various people around the world, but only recently have been accepted by modern science. The American College of Physicians only just endorsed medical marijuana in 20082 and the use of hemp, a member of the cannabis family, for health has been a staple of the natural health movement.3

This latest study from the Global Neuroscience Initiative Foundation shows that the benefits of using cannabis in multiple sclerosis therapies far outweigh the light side effects they have. In many areas, sufferers from MS have often turned to marijuana to relieve their symptoms, usually without a doctor’s knowledge or consent.

On some fronts, most notably the acceptance of medical marijuana and cannabis extract treatments, the main stream medical establishment seems to be finally coming around.

Resources:
1 – Whole plant cannabis extracts in the treatment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis: a systematic review, Shaheen El Lakhan and Marie Rowland, BMC Neurology, December 2009

2 – American College of Physicians Endorses Medical Marijuana, by Adam Miller, NaturalNews.com

3 – Hemp FAQ, by Mike Adams, NaturalNews.com

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