Marijuana safer than aspirin

The aspirin industry fought a warning label for five years – during which 300 children died of Reye’s syndrome.

When Bayer introduced aspirin in 1899, Cannabis was America’s #1 painkiller. Until marijuana prohibition began in 1937, the US Pharmacopoeia listed cannabis as the primary medicine for over 100 diseases. Cannabis was such an effective analgesic that the American Medical Association (AMA) argued against prohibition on behalf of medical progress. Since the herb is extremely potent and essentially non-toxic, the AMA considered it a potential wonder drug.

Instead, the invention of aspirin gave birth to the modern pharmaceutical industry and Americans switched away from cannabis in the name of “progress.” But was it really progress? There can be no doubt that aspirin has a long history as the drug of choice for the self-treatment of migraines, arthritis, and other chronic pain. It is cheap and effective. But is it as safe as cannabis?

History:

  • Marijuana has been used for over 5,000 years.
  • No one has ever overdosed on marijuana.
  • Aspirin has been used for 108 years.
  • Approximately 500 people die every year by taking aspirin

The Law:

  • Marijuana is a Schedule 1 drug, meaning the US government believes it is extremely dangerous, highly addictive, and of no medical value.(?!)
  • Aspirin is available for pennies and can be purchased by children at any drug, grocery, or convenience store. Often they are just handed out free by people with no medical education.

Marijuana side effects and dangers:

  • The dangers of marijuana include possible respiratory problems caused by the deposition of burnt plant material on the lungs. This danger can be eliminated with alternate forms of consumption such as eating or vaporizing the medicine.
  • For two to four hours, marijuana causes short-term memory loss, a slight reduction in reaction time, and a reduction in cognitive ability. (It makes you stupid for a little while.) These conditions DO NOT persist after the herb wears off.
  • Hunger
  • Paranoia
  • Depression
  • Laughter
  • Introspection
  • Creative Impulse
  • Euphoria
  • Tiredness
  • Forgetfulness

Aspirin side effects and dangers:

  • When taken with alcohol, aspirin can cause stomach bleeding.
  • Reye Syndrome in children: fat begins to develop around the liver and other organs of the child, eventually putting severe pressure on the brain. Death is common within a few days.
  • People with hemophilia can die.
  • People with hyperthyroidism suffer elevated T4 levels.
  • Stomach problems include dyspepsia, heartburn, upset stomach, stomach ulcers with gross bleeding, and internal bleeding leading to anemia.
  • Dizziness, ringing in the ears, hearing loss, vertigo, vision disturbances, and headaches.
  • Heavy sweating
  • Irreversible liver damage
  • Inflamation and gradual destruction of the kidneys
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Abdominal pain
  • Lethargy
  • Hyperthermia
  • Dyspepsia: a gnawing or burning stomach pain accompanied by bloating, heartburn, nausea, vomiting and burping.
  • Tachypnea: Abnormally fast breathing
  • Respiratory Alkalosis: a condition where the amount of carbon dioxide found in the blood drops to a level below normal range brought on by abnormally fast breathing.
  • Cerebral Edema: Water accumulates on the brain. Symptoms include headaches, decreased level of consciousness, loss of eyesight, hallucinations, psychotic behavior, memory loss and coma. If left untreated, it can lead to death.
  • Hallucinations, confusion, and seizure.
  • Prolonged bleeding after operations or post-trauma for up to 10 days after last aspirin.
  • Aspirin can interact with some other drugs, such as diabetes medication. Aspirin changes the way the body handles these drugs and can lead to a drug overdose and death.

So if safety is your concern, cannabis is clearly a much better choice than aspirin. If you eat it or vaporize it, it just might be the safest painkiller the world has ever known.

(sources: “Aspirin vs. Marijuana” & “Alcohol vs. Marijuana“)

https://i2.wp.com/www.saferchoice.org/images/SAFER/comparingdangers.png

Dependence: How difficult it is for the user to quit, the relapse rate, the percentage of people who eventually become dependent, the rating users give their own need for the substance and the degree to which the substance will be used in the face of evidence that it causes harm.

Withdrawal: Presence and severity of characteristic withdrawal symptoms.

Tolerance: How much of the substance is needed to satisfy increasing cravings for it, and the level of stable need that is eventually reached.

Reinforcement: A measure of the substance’s ability, in human and animal tests, to get users to take it again and again, and in preference to other substances.

Intoxication: Though not usually counted as a measure of addiction in itself, the level of intoxication is associated with addiction and increases the personal and social damage a substance may do.

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12 thoughts on “Marijuana safer than aspirin

  1. Did anyone see taboo on the National Geographic Channel? It was bashing cannabis it a way that was so aggravating I had to tell you, I’m emailing NGC next.

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    • Yes, and I am so glad you are contacting them. It’s somewhat subtle, the propaganda, because we are so used to it. But you are right, they spouted straight out lies and should be called on it.

      Like

  2. Tashkin concluded, “It’s possible that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in marijuana smoke may encourage apoptosis, or programmed cell death, causing cells to die off before they have a chance to undergo malignant transformation”.

    So basically the doctor who has spent over 30 years of his life studying marijuana and its effects on the lungs is saying that marijuana MIGHT cause cancer, BUT it kills it off before it does any damage?

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  3. Pingback: The Politics of Pain: Stop the Madness | AZ Green Medication

  4. Colorado visitors using marijuana more likely to end up in emergency room
    Out-of-towners go to emergency room at an increasing rate since legalization
    Date:
    February 24, 2016
    Source:
    Northwestern University
    Summary:
    Out-of-towners using marijuana in Colorado — which has legally allowed sales of the drug in retail dispensaries since 2014 — are ending up in the emergency room for marijuana-related symptoms at an increasing rate, reports a new study. Visitors are unprepared for the adverse effects of marijuana use. The study shows the importance of educating the public about safe marijuana use.

    FULL STORY
    Out-of-towners using marijuana in Colorado — which has legally allowed sales of the drug in retail dispensaries since 2014 — are ending up in the emergency room at an increasing rate, reports a new study from Northwestern Medicine and the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

    “Emergency room visits related to cannabis use have increased more dramatically among out-of-state visitors than among Colorado residents,” said lead investigator Dr. Howard Kim, a postdoctoral fellow in emergency medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and an emergency medicine physician at Northwestern Medicine. “This may indicate that out-of-state visitors are unprepared for the adverse effects of marijuana use.”

    Kim began the study when he was a resident at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

    The finding has implications for other states in which recreational marijuana is legal, such as Alaska, Oregon and Washington.

    The study will be published in the New England Journal of Medicine print issue on February 25, 2016.

    Adverse effects of marijuana use may include psychiatric symptoms such as anxiety, hallucinations and altered mental status; cardiovascular symptoms such as a fast heart rate, high blood pressure or palpitations; and gastrointestinal symptoms including abdominal pain and vomiting.

    Although the investigators did not study if visitors to the emergency room used primarily edible or smoked cannabis products, edible products such as cookies or brownies often have a delayed effect, which could lead to overdosing, Kim said.

    “People eating marijuana products often don’t feel any effect immediately, leading them to eat another edible,” Kim said. “Then they’ve ingested multiple products, so when the effect finally kicks in, it is much stronger.”

    In addition, the content of edible products is highly variable, so users don’t know the potency of what they are eating.

    Out-of-state visitors to the emergency room for marijuana-related symptoms accounted for 78 per 10,000 emergency room visits in 2012 compared to 163 per 10,000 visits in 2014 — an increase of 109 percent. Among Colorado residents, the number of marijuana-related visits was 70 per 10,000 in 2012 compared to 101 per 10,000 in 2014, a 44 percent increase. The research took place in the emergency department of UCHealth’s University of Colorado Hospital.

    “Anecdotally, we noticed that most out-of-towners were in Colorado for other reasons, such as visiting friends or on business,” Kim said. “They ended up in the ER because they decided to try some marijuana.” Most patients got supportive care and went home after a few hours, but some were admitted for further observation.

    “Everyone needs to be aware of the side effects of marijuana use,” said senior author Dr. Andrew Monte, assistant professor of emergency medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. “These results underscore the importance of educating the public and especially any visitors to marijuana-legal states on safe and appropriate use of cannabis products.”

    Monte said the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment’s “Good to Know” campaign has improved education of users across the state, reflected in lower rates of emergency department visits among Colorado residents.

    In addition, new regulations in Colorado require training on responsible use for budtenders, as cannabis dispensary workers are known. These efforts aim to decrease adverse effects for all users, including those with less knowledge and experience.

    Kim and Monte recommend that any states considering liberalizing marijuana policies should implement pre-emptive public health education campaigns.

    Story Source:

    The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Northwestern University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

    Journal Reference:

    Howard Kim et al. Marijuana Tourism and Emergency Department Visits in Colorado. NEJM, 2016 DOI: 10.1056/NEJMc1515009
    Cite This Page:
    MLA
    APA
    Chicago
    Northwestern University. “Colorado visitors using marijuana more likely to end up in emergency room: Out-of-towners go to emergency room at an increasing rate since legalization.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 24 February 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/02/160224223104.htm>.

    What is risk of mental health, substance use disorders if you use marijuana?
    Date:
    February 17, 2016
    Source:
    The JAMA Network Journals
    Summary:
    With more states legalizing marijuana for medical and recreational use, there are renewed clinical and policy concerns about the mental health effects of the drug.
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    FULL STORY
    With more states legalizing marijuana for medical and recreational use, there are renewed clinical and policy concerns about the mental health effects of the drug.

    In a new study published online by JAMA Psychiatry, Mark Olfson, M.D., M.P.H., of the Columbia University Medical Center/New York State Psychiatric Institute, New York, and coauthors examined marijuana use and the risk of mental health and substance use disorders in the general population.

    The study used a nationally representative sample of 34,653 U.S. adults interviewed three years apart in the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Analysis by the authors suggests marijuana use by adults was associated with increased risk of developing alcohol and drug use disorders, including nicotine dependence, at three years of follow-up.

    However, marijuana use was not associated with increased risk for developing mood or anxiety disorders. Although the study cannot establish a causal association between using cannabis and the new onset of disorders, the authors conclude, “these adverse psychiatric outcomes should be taken under careful consideration in clinical care and policy planning..”

    Story Source:

    The above post is reprinted from materials provided by The JAMA Network Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

    Journal Reference:

    Mark Olfson, MD, MPH et al. Cannabis Use and Risk of Psychiatric Disorders: Prospective Evidence From a US National Longitudinal Study. JAMA Psychiatry, February 2016 DOI: 10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2015.3229
    Cite This Page:
    MLA
    APA
    Chicago
    The JAMA Network Journals. “What is risk of mental health, substance use disorders if you use marijuana?.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 February 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/02/160217112836.htm>.
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  5. Are there any sources for the assertions that “in 1899, Cannabis was America’s #1 painkiller. … the US Pharmacopoeia listed cannabis as the primary medicine for over 100 diseases ? These are powerful statements that I would like to use, but it would be good to be able to back them up.

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  6. Danish cannabis is stronger than ever
    ScienceDaily
    Posted: 19 Nov 2015 11:23 AM PST
    The concentration of the euphoriant THC in cannabis has tripled in the space of 20 years in Denmark. The reason may be a systematic processing of the cannabis plants, some of which are being grown in skunk farms in Denmark. Cannabis of such high quality can lead to a greater risk of harm and adverse side effects. This is in particular a problem for the large group of young people who smoke it several times a month.

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    • I smoke it several times a day I’m sweet I make doe hav wife house car dog all good it is irrelevant what anyone thinks ganja is the shit

      Like

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