Cannabis and the brain

In Progressives Should Just Say No to Legalizing Drugs (US News), Carrie Wofford writes, “There’s a good reason drugs are illegal: They’re dangerous”.

She explains:

Drugs kill. They turn talented, intelligent people into impulsive animals. They destroy marriages. They deprive children of emotionally healthy parents. There’s a good reason drugs are illegal: They’re dangerous. Products that kill do not belong on drugstore shelves.

After reminding the reader of Philip Seymour Hoffman’s tragic overdose (whose heroin addiction was the result of legal drugs prescribed to him for pain), Wofford brings Cannabis into the argument by citing its deleterious effects on brain tissue: Continue reading

Did the V.A. Unseat Marijuana From Schedule I?

Seal of the United States Department of Vetera...

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Thursday, August 19, 2010

By Mike LaSalle

Department of Veterans Affairs Recognizes Medical Marijuana

On July 22, 2010 the Department of Veterans Affairs issued VHA DIRECTIVE 2010-035, specifically allowing VA patients the right to use Medical Marijuana without fear of federal interference. “Fourteen states have enacted laws authorizing the use of medical marijuana,” the Directive observes. “Medical conditions associated with the use of medical marijuana include, but are not limited to: glaucoma, chemotherapy induced nausea, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy and chronic pain.” Continue reading

Marijuana could be an “exit drug”

Via New Mexico Independent An often heard assertion about marijuana is that it’s a “gateway drug,” one that leads young people into using more dangerous drugs over time. But new research and programs are now examining its potential as an exit drug.

A recent study of a medical marijuana patients group found that a significant number of them were using the drug as a substitute for alcohol and other drugs

Forty percent have used cannabis as a substitute for alcohol, 26% as a substitute for illicit drugs and 66% as a substitute for prescription drugs. The most common reasons given for substituting were: less adverse side effects (65%), better symptom management (57%), and less withdrawal potential (34%) with cannabis.

Continue reading