How Cannabinoids Kill Cancer – Dennis Hill

See also: Biochemist Dennis Hill, who cured his stage 4 prostate cancer with Cannabis Oil, explains how it works

This brief survey touches lightly on a few essential concepts. Mostly I would like to leave you with an appreciation that nature has designed the perfect medicine that fits exactly with our own immune system of receptors and signaling metabolites to provide rapid and complete immune response for systemic integrity and metabolic homeostasis.

~Dennis Hill

How It Works (Abstract)

There is a plentiful supply of research articles and personal testaments that show the efficacy of cannabis effecting cancer remission. However, only a few point to the mechanism by which the cancer cells die. To understand this better we need to know what metabolic processes provide life to the cells.

There are two structures in most cells that sustains life; one is the mitochondria, and the other is the endoplasmic reticulum. The mitochondria primarily produces adenosine triphosphate (ATP) that provides the necessary energy. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a loosely bound envelope around the cell nucleus that synthesizes metabolites and proteins directed by the nuclear DNA that nourish and sustain the cell.

Let us look first at tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and observe that THC is a natural fit for the CB1 cannabinoid receptor on the cancer cell surface. When THC hits the receptor, the cell generates ceramide that disrupts the mitochondria, closing off energy for the cell.

Disruption of the mitochondria releases cytochrome c and reactive oxygen species into the cytosol, hastening cell death. It is notable that this process is specific to cancer cells. Healthy cells have no reaction to THC at the CB1 receptor. The increase in ceramide also disrupts calcium metabolism in the mitochondria, completing the demise to cell death.

The other cannabinoid we know is effective in killing cancer cells is cannabidiol (CBD). The primary job of CBD in the cancer cell is to disrupt the endoplasmic reticulum through wrecking of the calcium metabolism, pushing calcium into the cytosol. This always results in cell death. Another pathway for CBD to effect cancer cell death is the Caspase Cascade, which breaks down proteins and peptides in the cell. When this happens the cell cannot survive. Again, these processes are specific to cancer cells, no normal cells are affected.

Reference:
1. The Journal of Neuroscience, February 18, 2009 • 29(7):2053–2063 • 2053
Cannabidiol Targets Mitochondria to Regulate Intracellular Calcium Levels.
Duncan Ryan, Alison J. Drysdale, Carlos Lafourcade, Roger G. Pertwee, and Bettina Platt.
School of Medical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD, United Kingdom.
2. Mol Cancer Ther July 2011 10; 1161
Cannabidiol Induces Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer Cells by Coordinating the Cross-talk between Apoptosis and Autophagy
Ashutosh Shrivastava, Paula M. Kuzontkoski, Jerome E. Groopman, and Anil Prasad.
Division of Experimental Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

How Do Cannabinoids Kill Cancer?

The Endocannabinoid System (ECS) started revealing itself to researchers in the 1940s and by the late ‘60s the basic structure and functionality had been laid out. Today we know the ECS is a comprehensive system of biochemical modulators that maintain homeostasis in all body systems including the central and peripheral nervous systems, all organ systems, somatic tissues, and all metabolic biochemical systems, including the immune system.

This homeostatic matrix is not a recent evolutionary twist just for humans; we find the Endocannabinoid System in every chordate creature for the last 500 million years. It is a fully mature biochemical technology that has maintained health and metabolic balance for most of the history of life itself.

The two major interactive systems within the ECS are (1) the cannabinoid receptors that we find on all cell surfaces and neurological junctions and (2) the endocannabinoids that fit the receptors to trigger various metabolic processes. Looking at a cannabinoid receptor distribution map we see that CB1 receptors, that are most sensitive to anandamide, are found in the brain, spinal nerves, and peripheral nerves. CB2 receptors preferred by 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) are found largely in the immune system, primarily the spleen. A mix of CB1 and CB2 receptors are found throughout the rest of the body including the skeletal system. And yes, 2-AG or CBD will grow new trabecular bone. It is also useful to note that both anandamide and 2-AG can activate either CB1 or CB2 receptors.

The nature of the endocannabinoids are functionally much like neurotransmitters, but structurally are eicosanoids in the family of signaling sphingolipids. These signaling cannabinoids keep track of metabolic systems all over the body. This information is shared with the nervous system and the immune system so that any imbalance is attended to. If the body is in chronic disease or emotional stress, the immune system can fall behind and lose control of compromised systems. It is here that phytocannabinoids can pitch in to support the stressed body in a return to health. The cannabis plant provides analogues of the body’s primary signaling cannabinoids. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is mimetic to anandamide, and cannabidiol (CBD) is mimetic to 2-AG, and has the same affinity to CB1 and CB2 receptors; providing the body with additional support for the immune and endocannabinoid systems.

Phytocannabinoids supercharge the body’s own Endocannabinoid System by amping up the response to demand from the immune signaling system in two modes of intervention: one, of course, is in bonding with the cannabinoid receptors; the other is in regulation of innumerable physiological processes, such as cannabinoid’s powerful neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory actions, quite apart from the receptor system. It is interesting to note here that the phytocannabinoids and related endocannabinoids are functionally similar, but structurally different. As noted above, anandamide and 2-AG are eicosanoids while THC and CBD are tricyclic terpenes.

The National Institutes of Health tell us that THC is the best known because of its signature psychotropic effect. This government report shows THC to be effective as an anti-cancer treatment, an appetite stimulant, analgesic, antiemetic, anxiolytic, and sedative.

There is a plentiful supply of research articles and personal testaments that show the efficacy of cannabis effecting cancer remission. However, only a few point to the mechanism by which the cancer cells die. To understand this better we need to know what metabolic processes provide life to the cells.

There are two structures in most cells that sustains life; one is the mitochondria, and the other is the endoplasmic reticulum. The mitochondria primarily produces adenosine triphosphate (ATP) that provides the necessary energy. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a loosely bound envelope around the cell nucleus that synthesizes metabolites and proteins directed by the nuclear DNA that nourish and sustain the cell.

Let us look first at tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and observe that THC is a natural fit for the CB1 cannabinoid receptor on the cancer cell surface. When THC hits the receptor, the cell generates ceramide that disrupts the mitochondria, closing off energy for the cell. The cancer cell dies, not because of cytotoxic chemicals, but because of a tiny little shift in the mitochondria.

In every cell there is a family of interconvertible sphingolipids that specifically manage the life and death of that cell. This profile of factors is called the “Sphingolipid Rheostat.” If ceramide (a signaling metabolite of sphingosine-1-phosphate) is high, then cell death (apoptosis) is imminent. If ceramide is low, the cell will be strong in its vitality.

Disruption of the mitochondria releases cytochrome c and reactive oxygen species into the cytosol, hastening cell death. It is notable that this process is specific to cancer cells. Healthy cells have no reaction to THC at the CB1 receptor. The increase in ceramide also disrupts calcium metabolism in the mitochondria, completing the demise to cell death. Within most cells there is a cell nucleus, numerous mitochondria (hundreds to thousands), and various other organelles in the cytoplasm. As ceramide starts to accumulate, turning up the Sphingolipid Rheostat, it increases the mitochondrial membrane pore permeability to cytochrome c, a critical protein in energy synthesis. Cytochrome c is pushed out of the mitochondria, killing the source of energy for the cell. Ceramide also causes genotoxic stress in the cancer cell nucleus generating a protein called p53, whose job it is to disrupt calcium metabolism in the mitochondria. If this weren’t enough, ceramide disrupts the cellular lysosome, the cell’s digestive system that provides nutrients for all cell functions. Ceramide, and other sphingolipids, actively inhibit pro-survival pathways in the cell leaving no possibility at all of cancer cell survival.

The key to this process is the accumulation of ceramide in the system. This means taking therapeutic amounts of cannabinoid extract, steadily, over a period of time, keeping metabolic pressure on this cancer cell death pathway.

The other cannabinoid we know is effective in killing cancer cells is cannabidiol (CBD). The primary job of CBD in the cancer cell is to disrupt the endoplasmic reticulum through wrecking of the calcium metabolism, pushing calcium into the cytosol. This always results in cell death. Another pathway for CBD to effect cancer cell death is the Caspase Cascade, which breaks down proteins and peptides in the cell. When this happens the cell cannot survive. Again, these processes are specific to cancer cells, no normal cells are affected.

How did this pathway come to be? Why is it that the body can take a simple plant enzyme and use it for healing in many different physiological systems? This endocannabinoid system exists in all animal life, just waiting for it’s matched exocannabinoid activator.

This is interesting. Our own endocannabinoid system covers all cells and nerves; it is the messenger of information flowing between our immune system and the central nervous system (CNS). It is responsible for neuroprotection, and micro-manages the immune system. This is the primary control system that maintains homeostasis: our wellbeing.
Just out of curiosity, how does the work get done at the cellular level, and where does the body make the endocannabinoids? Here we see that endocannabinoids have their origin in nerve cells right at the synapse. When the body is compromised through illness or injury it calls insistently to the endocannabinoid system and directs the immune system to bring balance. If these homeostatic systems are weakened, it should be no surprise that exocannabinoids perform the same function. It helps the body in the most natural way possible.

To see how this works we visualize the cannabinoid as a three dimensional molecule, where one part of the molecule is configured to fit the nerve or immune cell receptor site just like a key in a lock. There are at least two types of cannabinoid receptor sites, CB1 (CNS) and CB2 (immune). In general CB1 activates the CNS messaging system, and CB2 activates the immune system, but it’s much more complex than this. Both THC and anandamide activate both receptor sites. Other cannabinoids activate one or the other receptor sites. Among the strains of Cannabis, C. sativa tends toward the CB1 receptor, and C. indica tends toward CB2. So sativa is more neuroactive, and indica is more immunoactive. Another factor here is that sativa is dominated by THC cannabinoids, and indica can be higher than sativa in CBD (cannabidiol).

It is known that THC and CBD are biomimetic to anandamide and AG-2, that is, the body can use both interchangeably. Thus, when stress, injury, or illness demand more from endogenous anandamide than can be produced by the body, its mimetic exocannabinoids are activated. If the stress is transitory, then the treatment can be transitory. If the demand is sustained, such as in cancer, then treatment needs to provide sustained pressure of the modulating agent on the homeostatic systems.

Typically CBD gravitates to the 5-HT1A and Vanilloid receptors. CBD stimulates production of anandamide and AG-2, endogenous cannabinoids that are agonists for CB-1 and CB-2 receptors. From there, immune cells seek out and destroy cancer cells. Interestingly, it has been shown that THC and CBD cannabinoids have the ability to kill cancer cells directly without going through immune intermediaries. THC and CBD hijack the lipoxygenase pathway to directly inhibit tumor growth. As a side note, it has been discovered that CBD inhibits anandamide re-uptake. Here we see that cannabidiol helps the body preserve its own natural endocannabinoid by inhibiting the enzyme that breaks down anandamide.

Research shows that THC is metabolized to 11-Hydroxy-THC in the liver after oral consumption. We also know that 11-Hydroxy-THC is more potent than THC. This suggests that cannabis via smoking, or suppository is weaker clinically than oral since it misses the first-pass in the liver to convert. If you want to avoid the mental effects, use 1:1 THC:CBD. The CBD knocks out the mental effect while maintaining potency of the cannabis extract. My opinion is that oral cannabis extract with equal parts THC and CBD is the ideal cancer killer without the mental effects. The cannabinoids work in concert to kill cancer; this is known as the entourage effect; THC disrupts the cancer cell mitochondria, and CBD disrupts the cell’s endoplasmic reticulum, bringing certain cell death.

Also good to know that hydroxy-THC has a stronger mental effect than unmodified THC. If the cannabis oil has not been decarboxylated (to delete the acidic carboxyl radical), then there will be no effect of the THC. This is the most important issue is using cannabis to kill cancer. Without decarboxylation, the THC cannot fit the CB1 receptor on the cancer cell to cause cell death.

In 2006, researchers in Italy showed the specifics of how Cannabidiol (CBD) kills cancer. CBD stimulates what is known as the Caspase Cascade, that kills the cancer cell. First, let’s look at the nomenclature, then to how Caspase kills cancer. Caspase in an aggregate term for all cysteine-aspartic proteases. The protease part of this term comes from prote (from protein) and -ase (destroyer). Thus the caspases break down proteins and peptides in the moribund cell. This becomes obvious when we see caspase-3 referred to as the executioner. In the pathway of apoptosis, other caspases are brought in to complete the cascade.

Even when the cascade is done and all the cancer is gone, CBD is still at work healing the body. Cannabidiol also shuts down the Id-1 gene; a gene that allows metastatic lesions to form. Fundamentally this means that treatment with cannabinoids not only kills cancer through numerous simultaneous pathways (the entourage effect), but prevents metastasis. What’s not to like. One researcher says this: CBD represents the first nontoxic exogenous agent that can significantly decrease Id-1 expression in metastatic carcinoma leading to the down-regulation of tumor aggressiveness.

This brief survey touches lightly on a few essential concepts. Mostly I would like to leave you with an appreciation that nature has designed the perfect medicine that fits exactly with our own immune system of receptors and signaling metabolites to provide rapid and complete immune response for systemic integrity and metabolic homeostasis.

~Dennis Hill

Reference:
The Journal of Neuroscience, February 18, 2009 • 29(7):2053–2063 • 2053
Cannabidiol Targets Mitochondria to Regulate Intracellular Calcium Levels.
Duncan Ryan, Alison J. Drysdale, Carlos Lafourcade, Roger G. Pertwee, and Bettina Platt.
School of Medical Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD, United Kingdom.
Mol Cancer Ther July 2011 10; 1161
Cannabidiol Induces Programmed Cell Death in Breast Cancer Cells by Coordinating the Cross-talk between Apoptosis and Autophagy
Ashutosh Shrivastava, Paula M. Kuzontkoski, Jerome E. Groopman, and Anil Prasad.
Division of Experimental Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/65/5/1635.abstract
Sami Sarfaraz, Farrukh Afaq, Vaqar M. Adhami, and Hasan Mukhtar + Author Affiliations. Department of Dermatology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/pubmed
J Neuroimmunol. 2007 Mar;184(1-2):127-35. Epub 2006 Dec 28.
Immune control by endocannabinoids – new mechanisms of neuroprotection? Ullrich O, Merker K, Timm J, Tauber S.
Institute of Immunology, Medical Faculty, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg, Leipziger Str. 44, 39120 Magdeburg, Germany. oliver.ullrich@medizine.uni-magdeburg.de
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endocannabinoid_system
Endocannabinoid synthesis & release.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cannabinoids
Cannabinoid receptor type 1.
http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/121381780/abstract?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0
Journal of Neurochemistry, Volume 104 Issue 4, Pages 1091 – 1100
Published Online: 18 Aug 2008
http://leavesofgrass.info/info/Non-Psychoactive-Cannabinoids.pdf
Non-psychotropic plant cannabinoids: new therapeutic opportunities from an ancient herb.
Angelo A. Izzo, Francesca Borrelli, Raffaele Capasso, Vincenzo Di Marzo, and Raphael Mechoulam. Department of Experimental Pharmacology, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, Italy. Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, National Research Council, Pozzuoli (NA), Italy. Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Natural Products, Hebrew University Medical Faculty, Jerusalem, Israel, Endocannabinoid Research Group, Italy
http://sciencenews.org/view/feature/id/59872/title/Not_just_a_high
Scientists test medicinal marijuana against MS, inflammation and cancer
By Nathan Seppa June 19th, 2010; Vol.177 #13 (p. 16)
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1766198/
NIH Public Access:
A house divided: ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate in programmed cell death
Tarek A. Taha, Thomas D. Mullen, and Lina M. Obeid
Division of General Internal Medicine, Ralph H. Johnson Veterans Administration Hospital, Charleston, South Carolina 29401; and Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina 29425
Corresponding author: Lina M. Obeid, M.D., Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, 114 Doughty St., P.O.Box 250779, Charleston, South Carolina 29425. E-mail: obeidl@musc.edu
P. Massi, A. Vaccani, S. Bianchessi, B. Costa, P. Macchi, D. Parolaro
Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences CMLS
September 2006, Volume 63, Issue 17, pp 2057-2066
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00018-006-6156-x?LI=true
Mol Cancer Ther. 2007 Nov;6(11):2921-7.
Cannabidiol as a novel inhibitor of Id-1 gene expression in aggressive breast cancer cells.
McAllister SD, Christian RT, Horowitz MP, Garcia A, Desprez PY.
California Pacific Medical Center, Research Institute, 475 Brannan Street, San Francisco, CA 94107, USA. mcallis@cpmcri.org
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18025276
Peripheral cannabinoid receptor, CB2, regulates bone mass. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1334629/
  1. Orr Ofek *, Meliha Karsak , Nathalie Leclerc , Meirav Fogel *, Baruch Frenkel , Karen Wright §, Joseph Tam *, Malka Attar-Namdar *, Vardit Kram *, Esther Shohami , Raphael Mechoulam , Andreas Zimmer , and Itai Bab *
http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/cam/cannabis/healthprofessional
http://cannabisinternational.org/info/Non-Psychoactive-Cannabinoids.pdf
Curr Pharm Des. 2006;12(24):3135-46.
Cannabinoids, immune system and cytokine network.
Massi P, Vaccani A, Parolaro D.
Source
DBSF Pharmacology Unit and Centre of Neuroscience, University of Insubria, Via A. da Giussano 10, 21052 Busto Arsizio (VA), Italy.

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61 thoughts on “How Cannabinoids Kill Cancer – Dennis Hill

  1. Here in the Philippines, I don’t think that they are going to legalize Medical Marijuana soon. My best friend’s mom has been battling with breast cancer and she hates taking pain pills and injections that her body doesn’t respond to. My friend told me that her mom tried to smoke a joint last week and all her pain was gone. Marijuana also made her get on a better mood! Cheers!🙂

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  2. What an article. You’ll be glad to know that the legendary Maximizer – with guaranteed 90% THC decarboxylation – will soon be returning as a great little cooker (it cannot be sold as a decarboxylator or it becomes paraphernalia) – activating THC and CBD for better smoking, vaping, extracting, consuming – and did you know, it’s sublingually active once you decarboxylate that bud? Effects in five minutes, great uptake, long lasting. We patented the decarboxylation of cannabis in 1982 – but it expired in 2002 of course. It’s the basis of Sativex and Epidiolex – I met Geoffrey Guy in 1998 (the G in GW) but I think that simple decarboxylated bud could actually take a chunk out of their market before they even release ’em. Like I said, one heck of an article – if this is true I’m a threat to cancer cells everywhere.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I am in remission from multiple myeloma. Following two complete cycles of chemo and stem cell transplants, one OK the last failed, my Oncologist sort of said he was running out of ideas. From the beginning of this year I have consumed about one gram of cannabis oil each day. The preparation is exactly according to Rick’s. Plant’s are organically cultivated wild strains at 500o FTASL under equinox conditions. In April-May my blood tests illustrated a return of the proteins associated with the cancer. Reading Dennis Hills comments I have to say that I have been thinking that decarboxylation’s would happen enzymatically in the gut and so avoid any negatives that heating changes, that occur in the resins cannabinoids, might deliver. So I am a bit confused as it would be pretty much impossible to smoke a gram a day. I have moved to two grams a day. I can say that the major benefit, to date, has been a feeling of wellness and physical recovery. Not pronounced, I am not about to run a marathon, but I can be a very strong walker rather than a runner🙂 I do not think to take any more complete cycles of chemotherapy. There are downsides that seem to lead to a mobility scooter; yes, I’d rather just shuffle off to the next galaxy. I can feel the damages from the cancer and general related aches but they are much less attention getting when taking cannabis. The next point is, that it does not seem to matter if I take considerable amounts of the cannabis oil I do not get stoned or in any way fuzzy-out of it from about the third day. I was not taking full one gram doses immediately but on the third day of taking cannabis resin I can describe an experience I had as being a little like an old car trying to start up on a cold morning. The sensation was like a car engine being cranked over and over until it would fire up. I sort of took this to be my cannabinoid system sort of turning on. I do melt some oil along the inside of a cigarette roll-up from time to time. There is a lift that is noticeable, mostly twinges and aches disappear like magic, but there is no feeling of being stoned, drink or in any way incapacitated. There are times when I have been like a led balloon after taking the oil but, on the majority of cases, far from stoned, skunked out in some heap drifting to sounds of Billy Brag I am most frequently energized into active interests mental and physical. After six years of full on treatments I am, by most modern standards, a reasonably healthy cancer patient. Will my cancer get killed by the cannabinoids? I don’t know. I am up for taking activated if I can be informed how my partner should make this. For now I am quietly pleased that I shall probably depart this world, dead from this cancer, feeling a great deal of wellness. I should say that this is a gift that humanity would make available to all any anyone as possibly the most efficacious of food supplements, if not a medical cure for anything in particular there can be little doubting the wellness on offer to so many people for a trifling amount. Hemp should be actively promoted as the exceptionally valuable commercial crop that is is and a crop that can contribute huge amounts o food, fuel and bio chemical supplies as well as performing it’s primary function of land repair and reinvigoration. As an intercropping over story or under story species C Sativa adds value to all third world cropping and agricultural systems. In the case of Pam Oil intercropping with Cannabis is an addition to the fight against wildlife and habitats destructions. If there’s one grass that the wildlife of Africa like to munch it’s Cannabis. Our Elephants can mow a good ten Ha’s in a night, leaving with big trumpeting smiles. We follow to get their pooh to plant out😉 Yup, who knows, Elephant pooh enhanced cannabis could be the one. We are happy to send samples of the brew. As said, the major most impressive and underpinning experience I have is one of wellness. Given that I know what it is like to actually experience chemotherapies impacts I can say that I consider that all and anyone suffering from long term illness of any variety can gain some return of wellness and if lucky, like me, enjoy your sickness time, either way it wont last. Killed or cured with cannabis ? Perhaps not a guaranteed cure for all cancers certainly a supplement or medicine that has to be part of any long term treatment and probably a freebie with a pension as anyone past 40 needs some ache cure and feel good.

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  4. How does one obtain the oils in the most effective doses? Im not sure if I understand the heating up of the oil? And what is the most effective way of getting said oils to the lung cancer cells?

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Lynn – Very simply, cannabinoids in the plant are acidic, i.e. THCA and CBDA. Heating at 240º for 45 minutes converts THCA to THC, which fits the CB1 cannabinoid receptor in the tumor, then kills the cancer. This is called decarboxylation because the CO2 is called a carboxyl group, and keeps the THC from fitting the receptor and killing the cancer cell. There you have it. Take the cannabinoid extract orally as oil, or take the oil as suppository to diminish the mental effects of the THC, if that’s your pleasure. ~Dennis

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    • My ex Has terminal cancer, my questions is do you need to take both the THC and CDB together to kill the cells. My understands was it is the CDB that she needs. It’s all very confusing.

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      • I’m sorry to hear that. It IS confusing. You should take it in a 1:1 ratio, Orally (under the tongue) and rectally. Dosing, etc., is a little complex. Have you checked out Rick Simpson Oil? We hired a MMJ consultant for my GF’s breast cancer, and that’s what she recommends.

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  6. Hi dennis,
    Im leslie rubio and my husband is astomach cancer patient (partial remive) went to chemo, radiation but now in recurrent stage again . Can you help us where to buy the oul. How to use it. We do appreciate if you can advice re. This .

    Regards,
    Leslie rubio

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  7. Hi Dennis
    Thanks for a great article that clearly explains the mechanisms whereby cannabis preparations kill off cancer cells.
    I am a research scientist with advanced prostate cancer and my due diligence led me to a similar conclusion after I surveyed a fairly broad body of literature in a somewhat haphazard manner.
    I was diagnosed about 18 months ago with prose cance that was staged as a Gleason 9(5+4) after the tumor was extracted via Da Vanci boho tic assisted surgery.
    I has salvage radiation treatment based on exponentially increasing PSA scores following surgery. Unfortunately, PSA scores increased at an even higher rate following radiation so I decided to start medical marijuana treatment last month.
    I am following a protocol that will deliver 60 grams of a preparation derived from two high potency strands of mariijuana over a 2 and 1/2 month period.
    I am conducting this as a single subject research design using data analytic procedures that Imhave published in several peer reviewed scientific journals, together with my collaborative Dr Donald Wheeler, who is an internationally respected quality improvement specialist.
    Would you be available to review the data Imhave gathered so far?
    It would be an honor if you would serve as a consultant/ co-author of the publication of you think it has potential scientific merit. Next week, I will have my first PSA result since I started treatment and the framework I am using to monitor changes in my PSA scores over time will provide clear guidelines for determining if that result is consistent with the hypothesis that the change is not an example of random variation unrelated to treatment.
    I would also like to ask you some questions related to suspected side effects of exposure to this level of THC continuously for the past month that I am experiencing.
    Thanks for any help you can offer.
    My direct e-mail address is
    pfadtag@aol.com if you would rather respond off site.

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  8. Hello Dennis and thankyou so much for this invaluable information on the therapeutic effects of the various component parts of cannabis. I have Stage 4 ovarian cancer and have been taking CBD Oil for about three months. I have felt well on this but have been advised by the suppliers to incorporate THC according to the dose regime below to maxmise the anti-cancer effects. However since I started the regime nearly 10 days ago my mood has dipped and I feel generally muzzy and tense. I am concerned that as I proceed to ever higher doses of THC these effects will be come intensified and so I am very keen to return to just taking the CBD oil alone.
    I felt so well on that and am interested to know how much I will compromise my chances of overcoming this widespread cancer by excluding the potential benefits of THC

    1g = 1000mg
    1000mg = 1ml
    25mg 1 x 1 over 5 days (5 Capsules) 125mg (Step 1)
    25mg 2 x 1 x 5 days (10 Capsules) 250mg (Step 2)
    25mg 4 x 1 x 5 days (20 Capsules) 500mg (Step 3)
    50mg 4 x 1 x 5 days (20 Capsules) 1000mg (Step 4)
    100mg 4 x 1 x 5 days (20 capsules) 2000mg (Step 5)
    150mg 4 x 1 x 5 days (20 capsules) 3000mg (Step 6)
    200mg 4 x 1 x 5 days (20 capsules) 4000mg (Step 6.5)
    250mg 4 x 1 x 30 days (120 capsules) 30,000mg (Step 7)
    (200mg 4 x 1 x 5 days (20 capsules) 4000mg (Step 6.5)
    150mg 4 x 1 x 5 days (20 capsules) 3000mg (Step 6)
    100mg 4 x 1 x 5 days (20 capsules) 2000mg (Step 5)
    50mg 4 x 1 x 5 days (20 Capsules) 1000mg (Step 4)
    25mg 4 x 1 x 5 days (20 Capsules) 500mg (Step 3)
    25mg 2 x 1 x 5 days (10 Capsules) 250mg (Step 2)
    25mg 1 x 1 x 5 days (5 Capsules) 125mg (Step 1)
    As you can see it is slowly building up to taking 4 capsules a day with 250mg per capsule for 30 days
    then reducing again at the end, depending on the severity it may require longer on 1000mg per day for
    this program 52ml/g.
    Step 6.5 is optional, many people like to add the extra step in just to ease the transition into the full
    amount.

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  9. Angela – I, too, would encourage you to use THC in your regimen, as THC is a powerful cancer killer and works cooperatively with your CBD to bring healing. You can minimize the effect of the THC by taking it in the evening, and just sleeping through the mental effects of it. This strategy worked nicely for me with the high doses of treatment oil. I hope this will work for you as well. ~Dennis

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  10. I can certainly relate to Angela’s concern about long-term exposure to the treatment protocol she describes.
    I started a medical marijuana trial last month to treat advanced prostate cancer[ Gleason 9,5+4]] which continued to grow rapidly despite surgery and salvage radiation treatment as intended curative strategies.
    My protocol is similar to that described by Mr Hill in that I will incorportate, via suppositories, over 60 grams of cannabis oil derived from a 50/50 mix of high THC and CBD varieties.
    I gradually titrated to my current daily dose of .8 grams per day by ingesting capsules which had .1 gram each. During that phase I definitely experienced my version of the “muzzy/tense” reaction Angela mentions. I was definitely “stoned” much of the time and felt like I was walking through molasses.
    These psychotropic effects diminished greatly when I shifted to the suppository form of administration, as predicted from reports by others. Not only is the bioavialibility of the product much higher via this route, but apparently not as much of the THC crosses the blood/brain barrier this way.
    Nevertheless, there is a significant “psychological burden” which must be considered before embarking of a prolonged regimen of daily exposure to such high levels of THC. One pound of THC was processed to create the distillate I am consuming 2 times per day. Over the course of 3 months, this corresponds to .17 ounces per day. I don’t know if anyone has translated these figures into “smokeable equivalents” but this certainly seems like a very large dose.
    I am writing this at about 11am, before I take my morning dose. It has been roughly 12 hours since my last dose. I don’t consider myself to be “high” as I write this. My writing is very tangential, with lost of elliptical references when I am high. I leave it to the reader to determine if that is the case now. However, I would not describe myself as in my “normal state of consciousness” either. There is a certain “stoned” quality to my momentary experiences and social interactions that is often noticed in retrospect, with a shrug- Oh yeah, I really am stoned. I am facing almost 2 more months of this condition, which now seems to have reached a steady state.
    It takes a lot of effort to get through the day in this condition, especially if I must interact with others all day in my “public persona” of Dr Al Pfadt, a mental health professional with nearly 40 years in the developmental disabilities community.
    Being retired certainly helps. I don’t think I could tolerate a work schedule as demanding as the ones I had when I was younger.
    I certainly won’t drive a car, not primarily because I feel impaired, but because of the legal implications of having such an elevated THC content should I be tested for any reason. I also would not make any significant personal, financial, or professional decision without consulting with others.
    I hope this contributes to the dialogue about the full implications of medical marijuana treatment that Angela initiated. Good luck to all of us pioneers!

    Like

  11. This question is on cannabinoid-resistant cancer.

    My grandpa has been a stage-4 prostate cancer patient.

    In the first weeks of his cannabis treatment, his PSA levels fell from 120 to 30 (in just 25 days) !!!!!!!

    But, due to mistakes made by me later in dosage (I stopped giving cannabis for 30 days, due to another medical problem he had), cancer has become cannabinoid resistant.
    (and PSA has been rising since 8 months and it is now 180)
    Please suggest something…

    It looks like his cancer has become cannabinoid resistant.
    It has perhaps mutated to find a way around the cannabis anti-cancer effect.

    His current dosage is: 1/2 rice grain..4 times day
    I know, I am increasing it gradually (my bad, that I could not reach the optimum level in time)..
    Despite the gradual increase I am doing, I am still seeing that the PSA is rising fast.
    40 points in 20 days.
    And I feel that even after increasing dosage, it may not work very well, as it has become cannabinoid resistant.

    What can I do , in this stage?

    1) Can I make it sensitive to cannabis by cleansing the cannabinoid receptors. How to cleanse?
    2) Currently I am using a cannabis-oil with 85% THC
    3) Shall I include synthetic CBD (example hu-331), in his diet
    4) SHould I introduce hihg concentration CBD oils
    5) Vitamin B17?
    6) GcMAF Bravo Probiotic curd

    He is only on hormone therapy. No chemo done ever.
    Also, at the time at which cancer became cannabinoid-resistant, we had given him ibandronic-acid / zoledranic acid infusions. (Cud this be the reason for ineffectiveness)…
    What can I do, please guide?

    Thanks

    Like

  12. Aparna – For your grandpa I would recommend 1:1 THC:CBD for several reasons. CBD is an excellent cancer killer (see attached), and works in concert with THC to kill cancer (entourage effect). PSA is primarily an index of inflammation, not necessarily cancer. Although cancer is inflammatory. CBD inhibits the mental effects of THC, so you can increase the dose more rapidly. CBD is an anti-inflammatory so will help the PSA. (https://www.projectcbd.org/inflammation).
    My second recommendation is for you grandpa to cut out sugar. When a cell goes cancerous, it shifts its metabolism from oxygen energy to sugar. This happens for two reasons: 1) this is a way the cancer hides from the immune system, and 2) the metabolic direction shifts from cell growth to cell replication, stimulating metastasis. Thus we see that sugar grows the cancer and makes it virulent. This is known as the Warburg Effect (Otto Warburg got the Nobel Prize in 1931 for this discovery).
    Hope this is useful.

    ~Dennis

    Like

  13. Dennis, My 85 year old father-in-law has just been diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer. He hasn’t started any therapy as of yet.
    Doctors , of course are recommending chemo, but I would like to get him started on the cannabis oil .
    We would like to make the oil ourselves, I am new to the cancer treatment. Could you recommend a strain of bud that would be best to use?
    I have my medical marijuana card, but have no idea what strains would be best.
    Any help would be appreciated.
    Thank you –Lee–

    Like

  14. If CBD counteracts the psychotropic effects of THC at an even (1:1) ratio, then why would anyone just use CBD only preparations for anything? Especially if the cannabinoid system works in concert and adjusts itself with both cb1 and cb2 receptors for homeostasis? And/or why isn’t suppository delivery the preferred method- or is it unless one isn’t concerned for the blood brain barrier absorption and THC effects? (But then again- wouldn’t an even ratio counteract?)
    Also- how is the proper dosage determined based on the known ailment? Are there so many CBD only products that tout no need for THC bc of the stigma and illegal nature still?? I know that I have a benign ovarian tumor- there may be other issues that I don’t know, but nonetheless, I am researching all I can for treatment that I figure will help whatever else may be lurking with an imbalanced system that has allowed a benign tumor to grow anyway- I live in Texas and therefore have obstacles- could you also explain what benefits are lost and what are retained from smoking cannabis? Thanks so very much

    Like

  15. Melissa – There is much opinion about all this, so here is another opinion. CBD inhibits the mental effects of THC somewhat. At 1:1 you can still feel the THC. Not sure how high you have to go to counteract the mental effect. THC kills cancer hitting the CB1 receptor, generating Ceramide to rip up the mitochondria, and killing the cancer cell. CBD kills cancer by disrupting the Endoplasmic Reticulum around the cell nucleus, killing the cancer cell. Both kill cancer, but the entourage of both is generally better. Breast cancer is more responsive to CBD than THC, whereas prostate cancer is the reverse. Suppository application of cannabis oil to the lower 2/3 of the anal canal drains into the internal iliac vein that goes directly to the inferior vena cava, by-passing the liver. THC administered to the upper third of the rectum goes to the portal vein and to the liver. THC is oxidized in the liver to11-hydroxy-D9-THC that is substantially more potent than by-pass THC. Proper dosage for any given ailment will come through human trials; we’re not there yet. Smoking cannabis gives a short duration, high intensity effect. Compared with cannabis oil extract, smoking cannabis is weak and useless for disease management. Hope this discussion will be useful in some way. ~Dennis

    Like

  16. Thank you so much for answering me and taking the time to do so- Yes, that makes sense. Ever heard of Constance Labs out of San Francisco? They promote whole plant sativa 1:1 oil recommended at least 2 months duration with 10g/mo for treating a condition such as mine (benign ovarian tumor)- It’s also $100/gram with a 10g minimum. Do you know of any doctors that actually treat patients w cannabis oil therapy where they monitor the levels needed based on the fact that it varies given our existing levels already, and that once built up, actually causes the dosage to lower over time? I’m having a hard time finding treatment doctors and not just recommendation writers.

    Like

    • Melissa – sorry to say I don’t know any qualified physicians who are treating with cannabinoids; I’m sure there are some, but not in my address book. Over time we increase the tolerance to THC and can take more. For the most part we have to be our own doctor. Follow the research, be self-aware, increase your dose according to your tolerance… everyone’s tolerance is different. ~Dennis

      Like

  17. Great article! MY GF is dealing with stage 4 breast cancer that has spread to her abdomen. She is having trouble eating and drinking. Hospice is now involved. We have started her on a controlled and powerful MMJ regimen – suppositories and sub-lingual, 1:1 CBD:THC. . I know you can’t know the answer, but is it possible that we can pull her out of this? Thanks.

    Like

    • Dan – Looks like you are doing everything right. The only thing I know is that cannabis kills cancer. So there certainly is a possibility she could survive. It just depends, at this late stage, if the cannabis can catch up. Hope it goes well. ~Dennis

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hi Dennis
        My last PSA test result will be in tomorrow.
        As you may remember, I documented a clear treatment effect after what I call the ” loading phase ” of my clinical trial which involved delivery of 65 grams of a high potency preparation of cannabinoid oil containing a 1/1 mix of THC and CBD via suppositories for across 3 months.
        My PSA level rose afterwards dramatically but this may have been because the tapering phase was too abrupt.
        Will let you know the outcome.

        Like

  18. Dennis, one other question. It’s frustrating that we have to start with such low doses, but I see why. Do you think that the beginning doses have some effect on the cancer, and how quickly does it begin to work? Thanks!

    Like

  19. Hi Dennis,

    My grand dad, who is 81, has throat cancer with a 10% tumor left after chemo. Would just CBD oil be even a little effective in curing the cancer, since he is on blood pressure medication and the THC might not be too conducive.

    If in case I am to use cannabis oil, how much of a dosage should we start with considering he is inexperienced with cannabis and damaged by chemo so is very weak.

    Also, since gathering the right strain at the moment is not an option for a while, does hash oil/charas work the same as cannabis oil.

    Like

  20. Hi Dennis,

    My granddad is 81 and has a 10% tumor left in his throat, after chemo. Would just CBD oil be of any use, considering he is also on blood pressure.

    He is very weak and inexperienced, so if cannabis oil is to be used how much dosage should we begin with?

    Like

  21. Purnima – CBD oil is strongly anti-cancer, so should help your granddad. Hash oil and charas both work the same as cannabis oil, as long as they are heated (decarboxylation) to shift the acidic plant oil (THCA/CBDA) to the bioactive form (THC/CBD). Since your granddad is new to this, start with a small amount; then as he adapts to the oil, increase up to tolerance. According to this website (http://www.wellspringcbd.com/CBD-Oil-Dosage-Size) dosage can start at about 25mg and increase from there up to tolerance. Hope he does well with this regimen. Namastè, ~Dennis

    Like

  22. Hi Dennis, thank so much for sharing this article. My father is fighting B cell lymphoma and we are open to all ideas. He has tried chemo and it has helped however it does make him sick.We are still fighting this disease, I found this article and it really gives me hope. Please if you would contact me back I am very interested in this research. Please.

    Like

  23. Hi Dennis. Thank you for writing this article, and for answering our questions! Very helpful.🙂 Is lymphoma more responsive to CBD or THC? I ask because I have found that even the minutest amount of THC oil (as in a single droplet) to be too powerful for me in terms of its psychoactive effects – and in a very unpleasant way with much fear, paranoia, panic, anxiety. It is essentially a 4-hour bad acid trip that is very traumatic. My quality of life is wrecked when I have tried it. I have been wondering whether a “CBD-only” oil would solve my problem?
    ~Kim

    Like

    • Hi Kim, I will see that Dennis gets this, but thought i would weigh in here too.

      You will acclimate to the THC, and it happens quickly. the first time i took a rice grain sized dose of oil, i also hallucinated (enjoyed it very much). I tried and tried to have that experience again and no matter what, it never happened. I can take 3 rice grains and will simply get tired, and have a nice sleep.

      anyone with human anatomy will have a somewhat similar experience. This is why “stoners” have to take “tolerance breaks” so they don’t waste cannabis. before too long, it takes more and more to get high.

      your tolerance will grow, but i understand the feeling that you don’t want to risk those horrible feelings and thoughts again, that going through that is too much and not worth it.

      the reason i wanted to weigh in is to share with you a somewhat unique view that i learned from my own experiences, as well as from a man in Canada who healed his cancer. i will look for his video, which is on this blog, but until then, let me just summarize what he said.

      He too had these nightmarish fear episodes, and he said it was perhaps the most healing aspect of taking the oil. the feelings and thoughts are real, they are stored inside of us, they have been repressed because we could not handle them at the time. repressed emotions become physical ailments. releasing those feelings, he believes, was paramount to his healing. so not only does the cannabis kill cancer cells, but it is also a form of emotional therapy, deep, deep therapy. if you have ever gone to a therapist, you know that it isn’t pleasant. for me, when those feelings and thoughts came up in therapy, i would instantly repress them. i didn’t have control over it, i would literally black out and come to, not remembering what the therapist had even asked me.

      the man believes that as his cancer was healed, the thoughts and emotions that caused it, or that were related to it, was also healed – “it has to come up to come out”, as healers are known to say. we have to face our demons.

      know that “this too shall pass” – nothing can hurt you in this process. you can watch it like a movie – as emotions and crazy uncomfortable fears come up, know that they are from the past, not the present, and that if you are witnessing them, it means they are leaving you, not the other way around.

      it’s sort of a shamanic trip you are embarking on, and it isn’t easy. people in South America take Ayahuasca to heal cancer and other things. the same thing happens to them – as they heal, they have to witness all the stuff they had stuffed. they throw up, they have scary visions, and beautiful ones. when it is over, their cancer is gone, or their resentments and depression or PTSD is gone (if you have Netflix, you can watch a short documentary on this – look for Chelsea Handler’s series).

      i write because i have seen people on this blog opt for an easier, softer way, and their cancer does not heal. i feel the urge to say – do not take the easy road when you are dealing with serious issues. i don’t want another reader to write us saying their cancer is not healing. CBD has been shown to be very effective alone for breast cancer only. for all other cancers, THC is the King, CBD helps very much, and will mellow the high, but it is too mellow for the task at hand.

      please forgive me for butting in, i know i have no right to give ‘advice’, but i just see too many people make the mistake of wanting an easier path.

      the man in the video went for it – he went through the nightmarish experiences, he took so much oil that for weeks he did barely anything besides sleep. and he is cancer-free today.

      God bless you.

      Like

      • Thank you for weighing in! That is a very useful perspective for me on this right now. I had been pondering the same thing myself a bit, i.e., the need to actually clear and release this negative energy (which comes from a lifetime, not from the THC itself) in order to heal. I had not articulated it so fully as you have here, and I had not really tied it into why this THC experience I am having may be essential to my healing, and why an ‘easier’ path might be a mistake. I would like to watch the video of the Canadian man who had this perspective with his cannabis experience.
        ~Kim

        Like

        • I’m so glad you found it helpful. I highly doubt i will be able to find the video, this blog is so packed and i don’t remember what i titled it. I’ve spend the last 1/2 hour online trying to find it, but it was pretty obscure, just an audio interview posted to youtube. I think i conveyed the gist of what he said, and although i really wish you could hear it, i don’t think you’re missing too much (he didn’t talk about it for along time, didn’t say much beyond what i did). But miracles abound, and if i do find it i will certainly reply back here!

          Liked by 1 person

    • Kim – The research on cannabis and lymphoma is pretty thin, but I have found most scientists and clinicians who have published on this topic write that both THC and CBD are therapeutic in treating lymphoma. The good news is that CBD inhibits the mental effects of THC, so that when you take them together you would not have the intolerable experience that you describe. Both cannabinoids kill cancer by different routes: THC takes out the mitochondria, killing the cell, and CBD works at the cell nucleus, killing the cell. Given that you have a bad experience with the THC, consider a ratio of 4:1 CBD:THC that would be much less distressing than the THC alone, and is more therapeutic than CBD alone. Experiment with this to find the best ratio for you. And if the blend is still uncomfortable for you, go solo CBD; this will work. Hope this is helpful. ~Dennis

      Like

      • Thanks very much, Dennis! That’s very helpful advice, especially about the 4:1 ratio of CBD:THC as a starting point for me, and I can adjust from there as needed. ~Kim🙂

        Like

  24. Hello Dennis,

    Thanks for the info; but I have one question. After being on the cure for around 2 weeks for breast cancer, my wife is experiencing pain in the lump and surrounding tissue. She’s been upping the dosage since starting; is now up to half gram per day. Is the pain/tenderness a sign that it’s working; and have you ever heard of this reaction before.

    Thanks,

    Mike

    Like

    • Mike – There is one thing that might explain the tenderness; it may be caused by the body trying to break down and dispose of the dead and dying cancer cells. The breast is highly lymphatic, so any swelling and soreness might reflect the metabolic activity in cleaning up the debris. This is just my opinion and should not get in the way of medical attention.

      Like

  25. Hi Dennis,

    Do you know where I can find CBD:THC cannabis oil in UK? I live in London and I can’t really find it, all I found is CBD Oil in amazon. Also, maybe it’s possible to ship CBD:THC oil to UK if I can find a suppler?
    I’ve been diagnosed with Stage 2 Breast cancer this March and I am only 27. I refused operation, chemo and radiation and went natural way: B17, kernels, soda, supplements and vegan diet. Looking for CBD:THL oil.

    Thanks
    Vlada

    Like

    • Hi Dennis, and others.
      I posted earlier about the results of my medical marijuana trial for my Gleason 9(5+4) prostate cancer which continued to grow exponentially after 2 failed curative attempts- surgery and salvage radiation treatment.
      The Rick Simpson protocol that I followed ( 65 grams of high potency THC and CBD in a 1-1 ratio administered mostly via suppositories dramatically stopped the progression of my cancer for the first time ( using commonly accepred PSA kinetics as a surrogate measure of PSA tumor growth. However this effect dissipated when I cut back too quickly on the maintenance dose.
      Dennis encouraged me to keep at it and I appreciate the list administrator’s comments about not avoiding the pain while trying for the gain.
      I found a combination I can tolerate and have hammered my bad boy once again with about 1 gram per week of this mixture which includes about a 2-1_ratio of THC to CBD.
      Not only this again stop the progression of my PSA test results but nuclear imagine studies( full body CT scan and CT scan of the abdomen with and without contrast) showed a reduced volume as well, to such an extent that the technician who read the results didn’t detect any cancer.
      When I reviewed the scan with my oncologist, who knew where to look to find the tumor that we clearly saw 6 months ago was still present.
      However, he said that there is no need to treat it at this time. He has a hard time reconciling this view with his opinion that Medical Marijuana doesn’t work, particularly when I reminded him that he wanted to enroll me in a clinical trial last year so that I had a chance to get a new combination of chemotherapy and chemical castration via androgen deprivation, that he recommended so forcefully.
      So Dennis- you were correct. If given a chance to work, enough THC together with enough CBD to make the psychotropic effects of the preparation, this is certainly a viable approach to treatment.
      My next PSA test result is in 2 weeks.
      I will keep you all posted.
      I there is any way to post a picture on this site, I will send you a photo of my graph.
      I am a research scientist who who specializes in single subject research designs and the one I am using for this study has several interesting features, at least to a data nerd like me.
      Dennis called attention to the need for empirical answers to questions like- what is the best combination of THC and CBD, taken at what dose and for how long, for particular types of cancer.
      Ultimately, well designed between group comparisons will be required to answer these questions.
      However, for now, each person can provide evidence that answers one part of this complex question by documenting the results of our treatment as accurately as possible, and analyzing these results as carefully as possible.

      Like

    • We need to know about all of the results- the good, the bad, and the ugly.
      My journey had had all of the above.
      Initially, when it was obvious that the medical marijuana was working, I experienced the bitter disappointment of yet another apparently failed treatment.
      As I mentioned ,Dennis and a medical marijuana professional from California I consulted with encouraged me to keep at it but I found a ” gentler path” I can tolerate.
      I am still ” stoned ” much of the time but I can time the administration of my heavy duty dose of current protocol, which as I said averages about .15 grams per day two products I take to treat/manage my Prostate Cancer.
      I had to reread this for clarity because my evening dose is kicking in. That preparation is the one with a 1-1 blend of medicinal grade marijuana derived from both Sativa( for THC),and Indica ( for CBD) the .100 mg tab of cannabis oil has a delayed but pronounced onset of psychotropic effects associated with being stoned- tangential thinking,with associated run on sentences, being the case in point.
      Thanks for all your support, Dennis.
      Readers who want to view my graph can either email me directly at
      pfadtag@aol.com
      Or you can go to my story page on the You Are Not Alone( YANA) web site.
      We are all flying by the seat if our pants or tagging on Dennis’s and the groups CV oat tails.
      Collectively, we are part of an emerging data network, where one can readily search through a variety of documents stored there.
      However, we also have to develop the capacity to sift through the chaffe to find any wheat that might be hidden away out there.
      Each of us has gems of wisdom to contribute to this community.
      One sub-group on the US Too Inspire web site that focuses on highly detailed aspects of the growing and preparation components of o practical distribution system for medical marijuana.
      We can support each other by sharing our stories so that others might learn from.
      Who knows how much valuable information is waiting as kernels of wheat thrown away by others who didn’t take time to listen.
      Listen to each other.

      Liked by 1 person

  26. Hi Dennis, I have been diagnosed with cervical cancer. I wonder if you know if the THC oil or the CBD oil works best for this type of cancer. I have been taking CBD oil for 2 weeks
    Best regards, Kerstin

    Like

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